MAMBO MAGIC AT SPLENDOUR IN THE GRASS
All Photography: Yaya Stempler

All Photography: Yaya Stempler

Splendour in the Grass has come and gone once again and thousands of festival goers are still recovering.

This year, Mambo made its mark in more ways than one creating a sensory overload experience covering all the major bases of a festival; the artistic liberation, the fashion and of course the music!

The Venus Fly Trap stood tall at the top of the ampitheatre looking over North Byron Parklands and provided the perfect backdrop for an insta-worthy shot. The Venus Fly Trap was based on Mambo artist Ben Brown's illustration and brought to life by Lee McConnell. 

“Our inspiration for this year was a psychadelic paradise where mutated Venus fly traps quite aggressibely eat people while they camp right near them. People attending this year’s Splendour can get lost in Mambo’s 'Wayside Rest Area’ on their way to the ampitheatre when taking the hill. They might not make the ampitheatre though,” said McConnell. 

Down near the Tipi Forest was an 8m long 3D mural for punters to interact with, created by all four artists, Lee McConnell, Lauren Webster, Ben Brown and Kentaro Yoshida

Mambo brought back the #SITGxMamboLoudShirt for festival goers who just happened to be in the right place at the right time, as well as gifting all of their favourite artists backstage.

Until next year Splendour… 

www.mambo-world.com

The Culprit Club-Back To Square One
Below: WIP artworks by Kiss, Bafcat, John Kaye, Aeon, Maid, Buttons,Lusid Art, Lauren Webster, Arswandaru, Pat Rogash and Dean Nenadich.

Below: WIP artworks by Kiss, Bafcat, John Kaye, Aeon, Maid, Buttons,Lusid Art, Lauren Webster, Arswandaru, Pat Rogash and Dean Nenadich.

Next Friday, Brisbane’s cosiest, yet most innovatively occupied art gallery, ‘The Culprit Club’ turns one-year-old.

After an insanely successful 12 months, featuring almost 100 local, interstate and international artists though a series of solo/group exhibitions, hosting over 20 events and launching a local creatives residency program, it’s crazy to think how far the the humble beginnings of The Culprit Club have come.

To celebrate their ripe young age, The Culprit’s one year birthday show, 'Back To Square One' is really something special. Keeping true to their ‘art amity’ ideals, they’re launching an all collaborative group show featuring 40+ artists who've been the heart and soul of the space over the last year. 

'Back To Square One' may be one of the first exclusively collaborative artist exhibitions we've heard of. With each individual bringing the uniqueness of their personal styles to compliment, contrast and come together with the style of another, it really is all for one, and one for all!

Make sure you head out to Winn Lane, Fortitude Valley from 6pm, next Friday 14 July to peep the collaborative works of all the artists, and party with the culprit crew!

Exhibition line up includes:
Aeon, Aidan Ryan, Alex Lehours, Arswandaru, Bafcat, Blex, Buttons, Billie Schneider, Chris Doyle, Chehehe, Chrissie Abbott, Dean Nenadich, Diz, Drule, Emmanuel Moore, Funeral French, Graham Hare, Hanna, Inkboy, Irok, Ivo, James Nye, John Kaye, Kiss, Kiel Tillman, Lauren Webster, Lusid Art, Lucinda Wolber, Lucks, Luke Henery, Maid, Markus Ravik, Memos, Oh Noes, Pat Rogasch, Phibs, ProCreativ, Reuben Stocks, Sevens, Shaman, Soda Mouf and 1337.

Join the party and full details via the Culprit Club's FB event page.

KENTARO YOSHIDA X BEN BROWN // RUMBLE

Sea-side Sydney natives, Ben Brown and Kentaro Yoshida, are set to bring the ruckus on Wendesday night at Goodspace Gallery, Chippendale. We spoke to the lads and gained some insight into the skull infused collaboration that is ‘RUMBLE’.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE-WAAL / PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB BIRCHALL

Tell us about your art style!
Kentaro: I have been drawing and reading manga since I was a kid. I grew up in Japan and moved to Sydney when I was 18. Since then, I have been living in Manly and have been influenced by the coastal culture here and the experience of living overseas by myself. The way I draw hasn’t changed much since I was a kid, I have always created clean line drawings as it is a basic technique in Japanese comics.

Ben: I have been doing art since I was a little kid, I am quite an old bastard - I grew up through the 70’s and 80’s and have been influenced by punk rock, skateboarding, surfing and all the goodness and art that accompanies those culturally rich underground lifestyles… basically - I like drawing skulls ’n stuff.

Give us a run down of how this collaboration came about…
Kentaro: One night we had few beers together at our local pub and we started talking about a collaboration and having show together. I also thought it could be a good opportunity to show how different our styles are as we both draw lots of skulls and are surrounded by similar cultures and environments. Ben has been one of my favourite artists since I was a uni student and I have respected him for a long time. I still remember my first task for my internship at O’Neill wetsuits - making something like Ben does! This collaboration means a lot to me.

What has the process been like working collaboratively with one another in the lead up to the show?
Ben: It has been really fun - we get on quite well and whenever we meet to discuss or work on the RUMBLE project, we end up drinking a lot of beer. It is really quite funny how the whole thing has pulled itself together considering we purposely had no concept or theme.


"We would email ideas back and forth to each other so we could both open our photoshop file and work directly on to the same piece using tablets. We later painted these designs on large canvases. We have truly collaborated in a very cruisey, Stress-free manner, it has been a lot of fun."

-Ben Brown


How did the name ‘Rumble’ come about?
Kentaro: We originally planed to make artworks separately, we got stuck on coming up with a concept for the show. One day, I was listening to one of my favourite Japanese bands, Dry and Heavy, and their song ‘Rumble’. I didn’t know the meaning of “Rumble” so I randomly found a meaning from dictionary. One of the definitions stated ‘rumble’ as ‘a street fight between gangs or large groups’ which made me realise it’d be really cool and fresh if we fight in the artwork! We came up with the idea of painting on the same canvases to create series of purely collaborative artworks together.  Fortunately we both live around Manly so it made the whole process way easier.

You’re exhibiting at Goodspace in Chippendale. Both of you are from the Northern Beaches and your work reflects that lifestyle and surf culture in general - has this had an influence on the works in ‘RUMBLE’?

Ben: We both do commercial work within that world and are keen surfers - but the work we have put together for this show reflects our individual styles crashing into each other. We made a conscious effort to steer clear of what people might expect and concentrate on the two of us essentially having a visual painting rumble that makes no sense and has no obvious references.


"RUMBLE is all about collaboration and visual experiment."

-Kentara Yoshida


What can people expect to see from the show?
Kentaro: RUMBLE is all about collaboration and visual experiment. Even I had no idea how final artwork would look until we finished them. We are both excited about how all the artworks turned out and they look really fresh too. Like Ben mentioned, there is no such theme or concept throughout the exhibition, but we did use limited colours and both of our characteristic and motifs to create the consistency across the show - that’s what I love about whole project. Our audience can expect to see our art crush and, of course, see lots of skulls. Come have couple of beers with us!

Ben: You can expect to see a tangled yet clean expression of our ideas clashing on canvas. We have stuck to a nice and simple colour palette and kept the themes and concepts completely meaningless and fun. We will have something for everyone. Original canvases, a limited number of t-shirts and sticker packs - and prints for sale online after the show…. all affordable art … all for the people!


Catch 'Rumble' tomorrow night 6-9pm, 31st May @good.space - 115 regent street, Chippendale, Sydney.
www.benbrown.com.au / Kentaro Yoshida

The Critical Slide Society Winter 2017 collection

The Critical Slide Society (TCSS) is back for the Winter 2017 Southern Hemisphere and Summer 2017 Northern Hemisphere season with a bigger, better and wittier campaign and range than ever before called ‘Greetings From’.

ILLUSTRATIONS ARSWANDARU CAHYO / PHOTOGRAPHY HUNTER THOMSON

Founded in 2009 in a sleepy seaside village on the Central Coast of NSW, TCSS was launched by a couple of surfers and artists, Jim Mitchell and Sam Coombes. 

What started out as a hobby turned into the well-known, authentic, creative label that surfers around the globe love to wear. TCSS is more than just a clothing brand however, they are a platform that celebrates an emerging alternative movement within surf culture: working with artists, photographers, designers, filmmakers and surfers from across the world.

For Greetings From,  Mitchell and Coombes have collaborated with Indonesian artist Arswandaru Cahyo who has laid his signature, comic illustrations over each campaign shot - giving the campaign a unique take of their surf culture compared to their previous campaigns.

Greetings From has also once again utilised the lens skills of Hunter Thomson. Hunter is a prime example of what TCSS represents, he started out as an intern at the ripe age of 16 and has now shot their most recent campaigns thanks to his eye for capturing raw "moments between the moments”.

Winning Best Boardshort two years running, TCSS are up for the gong again this year.

Interview with Sam Coombes


Tell us a little bit about your background and how you started TCSS
Back in 2000, Damien Fuller (The Board Collector) was an accessories designer at Mambo, he came into my uni and presented his design process. At the end of the presentation, he said, "And don't bother asking about internships or work experience... we don't do any." So after everyone left the room, of course I approached him about an internship or work experience. He flicked me Jonas Allen’s number (Mambo Art Director and now good friend) and for the next three months I called every Friday asking for an internship. Finally he gave in and I started a part time job at Mambo. I worked there until 2005. Across design, marketing and anything else I could get my hands on. I also met Jim Mitchell (my now business partner). I then took a slight career shift, working for MTV in a marketing role and later, becoming marketing director for their Australia/New Zealand branch. I worked at MTV until 2011.


"I started TCSS with my business partner Jim at the end of 2009. It was literally a weekend side project, a bit of fun. We did sink our life savings into it (which wasn’t too much) and got it to the point that it could no longer be run as a hobby. So in February 2011, we took the plunge and moved onto it full-time. The rest is history!"

-Sam Coombes


What’s different this season for Greetings From compared to your previous campaigns? 
It's a really fun collection. Super strong graphics and prints. Most of the graphics have actually been developed in-house by Shaun and Hopey. In terms of the campaign, it feels like a slight throwback to the kind of campaigns we used to run a few years ago, nothing too serious and a real focus on the graphic aesthetic.

Tell us a bit about your design process
For our most recently designed collection, Matt and I spent a week in LA, sifting through Rosebowl markets, visiting vintage stores. Much of what we do has a bit of a vintage reference – mainly 70s, 80s and 90s. We take some of those references and contemporise and update. The theme for the most recently designed collection is South of the Border. We thought this to be pretty topical, and basically referred to juxtaposition of cultures, as opposed to just a typical Californian take on South of the Border. There’s five of us in the office that throw the references and stories around, then they hit and we’re off designing. We’re really happy with the way the product is coming in. We’re all super proud. The creative campaign then ties back to the overall theme of the collection. 

Biggest inspirations? 
Geez, kind of suck stuff up from everywhere. For me personally guys like Shaun Stussy, Tom Sachs, Thomas Campbell, Geoff McFetridge. Music also plays a big part, The Growlers, The Strokes and the local scene that’s going on in Sydney influences our work. And the work being done by Shapers (who we work with), Dead Kooks, and Thomas Surfboards are all inspirations.

How did the collaboration with Arswandaru come about? 
We really like the guy. He would often send us graphics, or post stuff and tag us on social media. We liked the fact that he was keen to work with us, loved the brand and he wasn’t being used by everyone in industry. We have a good history of jumping on artists pretty early. We’ve worked with guys like Steven Harrington, Tyler Warren, Land Boys (Caleb Owen Everitt), Georgia Hill and more!

I heard that your photographer Hunter Thomson started out interning for you. Is working with future talents important to you as a brand? 
As mentioned, above, we love to be able to work with new talent. Hunter is 18! He’s turning into quite the photographer. He’s shot a number of our most recent campaigns. We love to work with new talent and build them up. To some extent this was the original premise of the brand, that’s where the society part of our naming comes in, it’s about forming a group of like-minded people. Hunter was shooting a bunch of the young surf kids up on the coast. Jim liked what he was doing and the rest is history. He literally just left today for a week long trip to Japan’s Greenroom Festival to shoot for us. He’s pretty excited about that. 

Describe TCSS in three words
Community, surfing, quality.

www.thecriticalslidesociety.com