Andrew Fairclough - Total Control

Sydney based illustrator and designer Andrew Fairclough’s first solo exhibition ‘Total Control’ features a collection of mixed media works on wood-panel, combining illustrative portraiture, painting and printmaking. 


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The works explore themes of introspection, confusion, duality and impulse control viewed through the dead-gaze of technological distraction and the mesmerising flow of infinite information that is everywhere and nowhere at once.  


The works explore themes of introspection, confusion, duality and impulse control viewed through the dead-gaze of technological distraction and the mesmerising flow of infinite information that is everywhere and nowhere at once.  

Inspired by dystopian fiction, mid-century illustration and low-brow comics, the resulting body of work constructs an uneasy yet hopeful atmosphere awash with abstract textural explorations and haphazard experiments.

Working mostly under his professional moniker Kindred Studio, Andrew Fairclough is an illustrator, designer and art-director best known for his textural illustrative work and vintage print aesthetic. Having participated in multiple group shows since 2012, Total Control will be Andrew’s first solo exhibition.

Opening: Friday 31st march, 6-8pm. China Heights, 16 Foster Street Surry Hills.

www.kindredstudio.netwww.chinaheights.com

 

10 Questions with Brooklyn Whelan

Sydney based creative Brooklyn Whelan is one of Australia’s finest emerging contemporary artists. Bringing elements from his days of graffiti writing together with his fascination with the unpredictable nature of weather patterns, Whelan creates dreamy pieces that are both minimalist yet other-worldly. We picked his cloud-infested brain about all things city, art and his upcoming solo show at China Heights gallery launching this Friday night.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I’m a  Sydney-based artist.

Your style is so carefully executed but soft at the same time, surely this has taken a bit of development! When did you start painting?
I've always created art. My style has evolved with the flow of events in my life. I know it sounds cliché but I just paint how I feel, my works take on a life of their own.

Clouds are evidently a bit of a recurring theme in your work. Why clouds?
There's something really powerful about an oncoming cloud front. I've always been drawn to storms and the way clouds rapidly move and transform like shape shifters. And lightning!

What were you like as a kid?
Ha. I didn't mind jumping fences and walking on the wrong side of the tracks. But in saying that I was still a good kid


"There's something really powerful about an oncoming cloud front. I've always been drawn to storms and the way clouds rapidly move and transform like shape shifters. And lightning!"

-Brooklyn Whelan


When you have a good look at some of your art works there are definitely undertones of urban culture. Has graffiti had an influence on your artistic practice?
Yep, for sure. I was an 80's kid which meant I was also growing up in the peak of the New York graffiti movement which hit Sydney pretty hard. Catching a train to school, it just seemed like a natural progression to try and emulate what I was seeing trackside and on 'Beat Street'. Ha


"All the paintings are large scale works using my signature palette of pink, grey and black continuing my fascination with sky masses. It will be my third show at China Heights (2nd solo). I'm really excited to show this new body of work."

-Brooklyn Whelan


Tell us a secret -
I hate avocado, but I love guacamole

What does the day-to-day of Brooklyn Whelan look like?
It's pretty routine. I try and have structure to keep the momentum. Wake up, make a coffee for my wife, walk the dog then paint. I try and keep it pretty chill.

Your exhibition, ‘Pushing Past’, at China Heights is going down on Friday, March 31st at 6pm. Tell us a bit about the show!
All the paintings are large scale works using my signature palette of pink, grey and black continuing my fascination with sky masses. It will be my third show at China Heights (2nd solo). I'm really excited to show this new body of work.

Is there anything you’re hoping people will take away from your exhibition?
A painting! And I hope for people to feel my works in the real.

What can we look forward to seeing in 2017?
More solo shows here and internationally.


Giant News

Early today Vivid Sydney announced its line-up for this year’s event starting in May. And we can’t get our eyes off the fact that Shepard Fairey is on the list. We caught up with Eddie Zammit to discuss the exciting news.

PHOTOGRAPHY: NICOLE REED


“It’s taken 3 good years behind-the-scenes to make it happen and we’re thrilled that he’ll be in Sydney for the first time in 14 years,” Zammit says. He will be headlining a Game-Changer talk as part of Vivid Ideas exclusively for Vivid Sydney in June – tickets have just gone on sale. Fairey will be speaking on Saturday, 17 June at the Sydney Town Hall. Tickets can be purchased here: http://bit.ly/vividshepard Zammit confirms that, “The essence of Shepard’s talk will be placed on his DIY mantra.”


“Creating is about sharing ideas, sharing aesthetics, and sharing what you believe in with other people. Vivid Sydney is the perfect platform to do this in Australia.” 

-Shepard Fairey


“Creating is about sharing ideas, sharing aesthetics, and sharing what you believe in with other people. Vivid Sydney is the perfect platform to do this in Australia,” says Shepard Fairey. As an artist he is best known for the OBEY art project, the HOPE poster promoting Barak Obama and more recently We The People campaign.

Outside of the talk, he is expected to paint the largest mural in the Sydney CBD. This will take place from 12 – 17 June. Stay tuned for details on that one. There are also plans to have a free exhibition at Darling Quarter.

More news as this comes to hand. 

Purchase your tickets here: http://bit.ly/vividshepard

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'Golden Summer' - A joint exhibition by Greg Straight and Ross Murray

An ice-cream run to the corner dairy; that road trip up the coast; a cold one on a long, hot afternoon. ‘Golden Summer’ celebrates all this and more on a nostalgic journey around New Zealand. ‘Golden Summer’, is a joint exhibition by New Zealand based artists Greg Straight and Ross Murray. The show opens this Friday at Endemic World on Ponsonby Rd.

How did the show come about?
Greg: Last year Ross and I were both featured in a street art / design magazine called No Cure based in Australia. They released a New Zealand issue and interviewed a bunch of amazing artists. Ross is from the Mount and I have family at Papamoa, so I decided to drop Ross an email and introduce myself. I am a big fan of his work and we soon became friends.

Last year I started researching and developing a series of art prints looking at different NZ landmarks and places, many of these were rural settings. On my way to the BOP I just kept seeing these typical New Zealand scenes and wanted to turn them into artworks. Ross had been working on a similar range and by coincidence we were totally on the same page but executing them in very different ways.

Ross’s works have a beautiful organic hand drawn feel to them often looking at old packaging and logos combined with retro styled cars while mine are all very hard edged, geometric and kept fairly simple in their compositions. We decided to put an exhibition together to showcase the new works and Elliot at Endemic World was the perfect guy to help make this come into fruition. 

Can you tell us about the theme of the show?
Ross: The show is essentially a celebration of the New Zealand summer. It features some recurring imagery: dairies, beaches, vintage advertising, Cortinas, Kingswoods and plenty of sun-baked landscapes. The overall tone is very nostalgic. Greg’s work has a beautiful simplicity to it, which in a way, symbolises the rose-tinted memories of our youth. And my work focuses on the idea of the summer road trip and how modern ideas of nostalgia are often linked to the things we consume. We both set out to make our artwork really evocative; so while a lot of the locations are imagined, they feel super familiar.


"I’d go surfing all day until my arms felt like they would drop off, sometimes taking out my Uncle's 9 foot Big Kahuna surfboard when the swell was small. The sand on your jandles, offshore breeze in your hair and the sound of laughter from the family sharing a long lunch together, that to me is my favorite memory of summer."

-GREG STRAIGHT


Favourite NZ summer memory?
Ross: My favourite NZ summer is a combination of two or three summers at Opoutere in the Coromandel where I lived about ten years ago. Collecting Tuatua and making fritters soaked in freshly squeezed lemon juice; that lovely long beach, completely empty except for the dotterels and oystercatchers; shady walks through the pines; driving to the local orchard to buy stone fruit and Frujus; watching the kaka fly north in the morning and return south at night; and bobbing in the surf at dusk with the bronze whalers.

Greg: It would have to be the family tiki tours down to Papamoa to visit my Aunty Hazel and Uncle Jim back when I was young. We would all pile into the old station wagon, me and my two brothers in the back or sometimes boot with surfboards on the roof, fishing rods and enough luggage to sink a ship. My Uncle would put the long line out and catch fresh snapper for dinner and aunty would make a huge spread with veges and salad grown from their garden and hot Tuatua fritters. 

Although they had very little money they had huge hearts and would welcome anyone into their home. I’d go surfing all day until my arms felt like they would drop off, sometimes taking out my Uncle's 9 foot Big Kahuna surfboard when the swell was small. The sand on your jandles, offshore breeze in your hair and the sound of laughter from the family sharing a long lunch together, that to me is my favorite memory of summer.

 www.rossmurray.com / www.gregstraight.com / www.endemicworld.com