Posts tagged photography
The Critical Slide Society Winter 2017 collection

The Critical Slide Society (TCSS) is back for the Winter 2017 Southern Hemisphere and Summer 2017 Northern Hemisphere season with a bigger, better and wittier campaign and range than ever before called ‘Greetings From’.

ILLUSTRATIONS ARSWANDARU CAHYO / PHOTOGRAPHY HUNTER THOMSON

Founded in 2009 in a sleepy seaside village on the Central Coast of NSW, TCSS was launched by a couple of surfers and artists, Jim Mitchell and Sam Coombes. 

What started out as a hobby turned into the well-known, authentic, creative label that surfers around the globe love to wear. TCSS is more than just a clothing brand however, they are a platform that celebrates an emerging alternative movement within surf culture: working with artists, photographers, designers, filmmakers and surfers from across the world.

For Greetings From,  Mitchell and Coombes have collaborated with Indonesian artist Arswandaru Cahyo who has laid his signature, comic illustrations over each campaign shot - giving the campaign a unique take of their surf culture compared to their previous campaigns.

Greetings From has also once again utilised the lens skills of Hunter Thomson. Hunter is a prime example of what TCSS represents, he started out as an intern at the ripe age of 16 and has now shot their most recent campaigns thanks to his eye for capturing raw "moments between the moments”.

Winning Best Boardshort two years running, TCSS are up for the gong again this year.

Interview with Sam Coombes


Tell us a little bit about your background and how you started TCSS
Back in 2000, Damien Fuller (The Board Collector) was an accessories designer at Mambo, he came into my uni and presented his design process. At the end of the presentation, he said, "And don't bother asking about internships or work experience... we don't do any." So after everyone left the room, of course I approached him about an internship or work experience. He flicked me Jonas Allen’s number (Mambo Art Director and now good friend) and for the next three months I called every Friday asking for an internship. Finally he gave in and I started a part time job at Mambo. I worked there until 2005. Across design, marketing and anything else I could get my hands on. I also met Jim Mitchell (my now business partner). I then took a slight career shift, working for MTV in a marketing role and later, becoming marketing director for their Australia/New Zealand branch. I worked at MTV until 2011.


"I started TCSS with my business partner Jim at the end of 2009. It was literally a weekend side project, a bit of fun. We did sink our life savings into it (which wasn’t too much) and got it to the point that it could no longer be run as a hobby. So in February 2011, we took the plunge and moved onto it full-time. The rest is history!"

-Sam Coombes


What’s different this season for Greetings From compared to your previous campaigns? 
It's a really fun collection. Super strong graphics and prints. Most of the graphics have actually been developed in-house by Shaun and Hopey. In terms of the campaign, it feels like a slight throwback to the kind of campaigns we used to run a few years ago, nothing too serious and a real focus on the graphic aesthetic.

Tell us a bit about your design process
For our most recently designed collection, Matt and I spent a week in LA, sifting through Rosebowl markets, visiting vintage stores. Much of what we do has a bit of a vintage reference – mainly 70s, 80s and 90s. We take some of those references and contemporise and update. The theme for the most recently designed collection is South of the Border. We thought this to be pretty topical, and basically referred to juxtaposition of cultures, as opposed to just a typical Californian take on South of the Border. There’s five of us in the office that throw the references and stories around, then they hit and we’re off designing. We’re really happy with the way the product is coming in. We’re all super proud. The creative campaign then ties back to the overall theme of the collection. 

Biggest inspirations? 
Geez, kind of suck stuff up from everywhere. For me personally guys like Shaun Stussy, Tom Sachs, Thomas Campbell, Geoff McFetridge. Music also plays a big part, The Growlers, The Strokes and the local scene that’s going on in Sydney influences our work. And the work being done by Shapers (who we work with), Dead Kooks, and Thomas Surfboards are all inspirations.

How did the collaboration with Arswandaru come about? 
We really like the guy. He would often send us graphics, or post stuff and tag us on social media. We liked the fact that he was keen to work with us, loved the brand and he wasn’t being used by everyone in industry. We have a good history of jumping on artists pretty early. We’ve worked with guys like Steven Harrington, Tyler Warren, Land Boys (Caleb Owen Everitt), Georgia Hill and more!

I heard that your photographer Hunter Thomson started out interning for you. Is working with future talents important to you as a brand? 
As mentioned, above, we love to be able to work with new talent. Hunter is 18! He’s turning into quite the photographer. He’s shot a number of our most recent campaigns. We love to work with new talent and build them up. To some extent this was the original premise of the brand, that’s where the society part of our naming comes in, it’s about forming a group of like-minded people. Hunter was shooting a bunch of the young surf kids up on the coast. Jim liked what he was doing and the rest is history. He literally just left today for a week long trip to Japan’s Greenroom Festival to shoot for us. He’s pretty excited about that. 

Describe TCSS in three words
Community, surfing, quality.

www.thecriticalslidesociety.com

REBEL8'S HEAVY HITTERS COLLECTION

"Whether you’ve actually played the game or just drank a beer watching it, there’s something magical about baseball. For almost two centuries baseball has cemented itself as America’s pastime.

The idea behind the Heavy Hitters collection first began with a simple yet fun question. What would it look like if REBEL8 was an actual baseball team? We continued to ask ourselves, what would we be called? Eighters. What would be our team colors? Black, of course. What would our jerseys look like? Fucking awesome.

Although this concept is mere fiction, we still couldn’t seem to escape who we are in real life. We are the Eighters. We are social misfits, degenerates, and unapologetic in our distaste for authority. This collection showcases our trademark attitude through select clothing and collaborative pieces with Rawlings and Louisville Slugger.

Rawlings is a US sports equipment manufacturing company founded in 1887 and has been the official supplier of baseballs to the major leagues since 1977. Louisville Slugger baseball bats date back to 1884 with the major leagues and to this day are still made in the United States with American White Ash wood. Many of today’s baseball greats and those of the past, including Babe Ruth, continually choose to use Louisville Slugger. Both of these heritage brands are the epitome of longevity and quality. Their rich history is engrained in both the social fabric of America and America’s sport.

It is an absolute honor for us to collaborate with these staple brands and share our story through their products.”

The collection drops on REBEL8.com Wednesday July 20th. 

Surf City

WORDS: TROY PROUDFOOT / PHOTOGRAPHY: @KINGSTONPHOTO

THE YEAR WAS 1958, AND THERE, BENEATH THE HOT CALIFORNIAN SUMMER SUN, THE GREAT WHITE HOPE THAT BECAME TO BE KNOWN AS SALTON CITY WAS BORN INTO A MODERN WORLD FILLED WITH SO MANY FAILED STARTS AND STRAINED ATTEMPTS. HERE WAS AN ECLECTIC ’50S SUBURBAN WONDERLAND IN ITS INFANCY, BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH OVERFLOWING OPTIMISM, AND YET A RISING SALINE SEA WAS ENOUGH TO BRING IT CRUMBLING TO ITS KNEES. IT WAS AN IMAGINARY CITY OF NEW BEGINNINGS THAT SHONE LIKE THE GREAT AMERICAN DREAM, WITH AN EXPIRATION DATE THAT CAME WAY TOO SOON.

It’s a zip code that once brought tourists in droves to the sandy beaches of the salton sea but now sits silent and desolate. A heart that once beat at its core now lies shattered in pieces as the remnants of a bygone era litter the streets and muddy the shoreline. North shore is now the outlands of the golden age where the surfers, rogue hearts and disenchanted all came to spend their endless summers, but really only came to live and die quietly in the night.

Setting out on the road from Salton City is like driving on a road to nowhere. It reaches up to consume all who venture into a realm that is honestly just disintegrating there in plain sight beneath the California sun. On approach, it’s the initial sight of the manmade ‘Salvation Mountain’ emblazoned in its colourful religious epitaphs out there in an the unforgiving setting of the Colorado desert that takes your breath away. Post-apocalyptic hell in essence, yet strangely beautiful and awe-inspiring in nature.

Dilapidated rest stops and gas stations now serve as sentries to a long forgotten villa of abandoned hair salons, hardware stores, trailer parks, houses of worship and drugstores. Out here in the slabs, squatters and nomads known as ‘snowbirds’ return to the outlands for the winter months to live off the grid and thrive in the middle of fucking nowhere, just to prove that technology is the root of all evil. Summertime sadness reigns supreme out here among the art installations, forgotten dreams, grit and grime.

Want this in print? Surf City is available in newsagents throughout Australia and our online shop.

 

 

 

 

The Past is Present
Feature-image-broadway-2_web.jpg

As many sit still, relaxed in reality, watching and waiting for the future to arrive from an increasingly expensive and acutely governed theatre seat, we sneak away from bores of society to adventure through the neglected spaces long abandoned by the past. 

WORDS: SARAH HAZLEHURST / PHOTOGRAPHY: LUKE HENERY


For us, it’s plain to see there’s much more sense and significance in the abandoned and ignored rooms of empty buildings than in the day-to-day falsifying facets of the cityscape.  

It’s true that some choose to overlook the existence of these places and let the confines of legality dictate ignorance, but we relish in the emptiness, the abandoned and the forgotten. We ignore the regulation against entry and accept the lessons and experiences of exploration. 

Let these images remind you of what is real, what is lost and what is left behind.


ELECTRIC ENCOUNTERS
Once a coal-fuelled power station, this abandoned space is now a sanctuary for artists of all kinds. At five storeys high, it’s easy to lose yourself in admiration looking at the sheer volume of art that occupies every wall. Boasting a historical past and colourful present, this space features the works of many, both local and world-renowned, acting as a visual projection for the artistically inclined. 

IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH

This building was an aged care center. It is now unused and uninhabited on a busy main road. Previously occupied by nurses and elderly patients, it’s concerning to think what happened to everyone who lived here. This block of buildings now stands alone behind a barrier fence. Every door is open. It’s almost as if someone is calling out to invite the curious to come inside. This bathtub was found full of water. The roof was flooding in from above. The atmosphere here was so empty and alone. In its current abandoned form, mixed with the predicted thoughts of loss and helplessness for those who resided here, this place is a reminder of what nightmares are really made of. 

PALMS AND PARADISE

What was once an enormous nursery and gardening centre, is now an abandoned abyss. The place is so large, you can become lost in a matter of minutes. So many remnants and reminders have been left behind. There are plants and pottery at every corner! This place is truly a palace to behold. Taking in the sheer size of it is nothing short of breathtaking. Why anyone would choose to leave this place, we’ll likely never know. This abandoned business and deserted home is an extraordinary playground full of peculiar sights. 

SCHOOL OF SIN

This building was an educational institution for tertiary and further education. It once schooled many creatively talented individuals. It now serves as a canvas for illicitly inclined artists and acts as an overwhelming source of inspiration for explorers. It’s a task to find a blank wall seeing so many have visited before. It’s so interesting to see the names and tags people have left here. Some might say this space was destroyed by graffiti, but we wouldn’t. Here, vandals can show artistic expression at a site long abandoned by its inhabitants.