Posts in 10 Questions
10 Questions with Steve Leadbeater
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With his exciting blend of typography and photography, and his use of minimal materials coupled with a primal attitude, Melbourne based artist Steve Leadbeater wants you to be challenged by his drawings and paintings. His upcoming independent show Within Us inspired No Cure to delve into his creative mind and explore his raw and dark artwork.

INTERVIEW: SALLY O'BRIEN


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Could you please introduce yourself to the world?
Hi. I’m an independent artist from the Eastern suburbs of Melbourne. I write with dark humour and paint from the heart. My middle class story is one many would hide, but I’ve embraced it. Yes, Leadbeater is my real surname.

How would you describe your artistic style?
Primal and emotionally layered imagery that explores the human condition - OR - Like looking in a mirror with transparent skin and your heart on fire.

Which projects are you most proud of and why?
I’m most proud of my 365 Days of Leadbeater project where I shared new work on Instagram daily for a year. The challenge made me hardcore disciplined, defined my direction as an artist and significantly grew my audience.

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Many of your pieces incorporate words and text. What drew you to experiment with type?
Sometimes words are more powerful than images. I have a graphic design background and have a passion for typographic communication. The designer in me wants to connect with you any way I can.

Tell us a bit about your artistic process. What materials do you like to use in your artwork?
I constantly take photos and write ideas on my phone, draw in a visual diary, read books and collect reference that speaks to me. When the pressure of all the inspiration has built up I create things until the energy has gone. I work on whatever material is in front of me.


"I’m most proud of my 365 Days of Leadbeater project where I shared new work on Instagram daily for a year. The challenge made me hardcore disciplined, defined my direction as an artist and significantly grew my audience."

- Steve Leadbeater


How do you think Melbourne has shaped your art?
Melbourne shaped me so its effect on my work is profound. It’s hard to separate myself from my environment. I’m very lucky that I live in a city that is so committed to the arts with businesses that are finally acknowledging the value of creativity. I’m in the right place.

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What would you like your work to tell your audience?
People have extreme emotional reactions to my work (positive and negative). I want them to be reminded of the immense power, vulnerability and mystery of being human. I diffuse this seriousness with contemporary references and irreverent statements using high impact type.

What are you currently working on?
100 LEADBEATERed Selfies, where people send me selfies and I create work using them as a base. It’s an awesome way to stay fresh working with unexpected images. It gives an insight into my process seeing the before and after.  

Could we hear more about your future artistic goals and your plans of world domination?
Hahaha - that comes from a Venn diagram I did a while back. My plan is to keep creating, keep improving, keep sharing my stories and to live off my work. I tend to inspire others. I show them that a public educated, suburban bogan with a family, a demanding career and zero time can still follow their dream - regardless of how impossible everyone says it is. So if that’s possible, anything is right?

You describe your upcoming show as your most ambitious and risky endeavour yet, what can we expect from Within Us?
It’s ambitious narrowing my focus to a single theme and creating new work while ignoring hundreds of others. It’s risky putting myself and my work out there with everything on the line. What you can expect from WITHIN US is some wild and confronting art, amazing live music, great beers and a sea of horrified onlookers. Basically, if you like independent art, good times and you’re in Fitzroy North - you’re also in luck.

The opening night of Within US will be held on Friday 20 April 6-11pm, 151 St Georges Rd, Fitzroy North.

@leadbeater
www.steveleadbeater.com

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10 QUESTIONS WITH KYLE HUGHES-ODGERS
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Combining beautifully curated colour palettes and a sprinkle of childhood nostalgia, Kyle Hughes-Odgers splashes brand new worlds on to walls internationally. With the successful release of multiple childrens’ books, Hughes-Odgers is taking the art world by storm. Here at No Cure we love to sneak inside the brains of great creatives, so we sat down with Kyle for a chat! Here’s what we found out...

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I'm visual artist based in Perth, W.A

What does a typical day in the life of Kyle Hughes-Odgers look like?
I wake up, hang out with my son, coffee, emails, catch the train to my studio in Fremantle, coffee, painting, emails, go home, hang out with my son.

Amongst many other achievements, you’ve written and illustrated your own children’s books including titles such as ‘Ten Tiny Things’ and ‘Can a Skeleton Have an X-Ray?’. What drew you towards creating work for children?
Children's books are still broadly accepted in the conservative adult world when they are very strange and unique. I have always loved this, like little creative revolutions sitting patiently waiting to be considered in homes around the world. When I was small it seemed like a dream that adults could draw and make strange books for a living. Most of my work is narrative based so a children's book is a good way of extending concepts and ideas.

Much of your work is quite soft and playful in colour and subject matter. Where do you draw your inspiration?
I make lots of notes around narratives and concepts I find interesting / little drawings of compositions or spacial balance that I might see in nature and want to remember. I like to use colours that are more sophisticated and muted than loud and obnoxious.

Do you feel as though your style has changed much over time?
Yes, it is constantly changing. 12 years ago I only drew black and white posters of people with tattoos and 10 double chins. I think it's important it grows and moves as I get older and moves with what I find interesting.

You recently completed the painting of 4 silos as part of Art in the Wheatbelt. Tell us a bit about the project!
I was commissioned to paint 4 x 35m silos in Merredin in the wheatbelt of Western Australia. The work is part of a bigger project called the public silo trail in Western Australia and aims to cast a light on these beautiful, distinctive regions. Tourism maps will connect the completed silos for visitors to tour. It was a great and challenging project to paint at such an extreme scale.

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"I was commissioned to paint 4 x 35m silos in Merredin in the wheatbelt of Western Australia. The work is part of a bigger project called the public silo trail in Western Australia and aims to cast a light on these beautiful, distinctive regions."

-Kyle Hughes-Odgers


Is there anything you aim for people to take away from your art?
Recently I have been actively trying to make more positive narratives / works rather than focusing on the negative. Making paintings about celebrating human problem solving and ingenuity and also playing with colour and abstraction. Focusing on the broader idea of human spirit.

Tell us a secret...
Secrets are for creeps.

What can we expect to see from you in the near future?
More public art, I have solo exhibitions in Madrid and Melbourne next year, and working on more book ideas.

Any advice for the kids of tomorrow?
Don't wait to be magically basquiated into the artworld. Work really hard.

www.kylehughesodgers.com

10 Questions with Brooklyn Whelan

Sydney based creative Brooklyn Whelan is one of Australia’s finest emerging contemporary artists. Bringing elements from his days of graffiti writing together with his fascination with the unpredictable nature of weather patterns, Whelan creates dreamy pieces that are both minimalist yet other-worldly. We picked his cloud-infested brain about all things city, art and his upcoming solo show at China Heights gallery launching this Friday night.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I’m a  Sydney-based artist.

Your style is so carefully executed but soft at the same time, surely this has taken a bit of development! When did you start painting?
I've always created art. My style has evolved with the flow of events in my life. I know it sounds cliché but I just paint how I feel, my works take on a life of their own.

Clouds are evidently a bit of a recurring theme in your work. Why clouds?
There's something really powerful about an oncoming cloud front. I've always been drawn to storms and the way clouds rapidly move and transform like shape shifters. And lightning!

What were you like as a kid?
Ha. I didn't mind jumping fences and walking on the wrong side of the tracks. But in saying that I was still a good kid


"There's something really powerful about an oncoming cloud front. I've always been drawn to storms and the way clouds rapidly move and transform like shape shifters. And lightning!"

-Brooklyn Whelan


When you have a good look at some of your art works there are definitely undertones of urban culture. Has graffiti had an influence on your artistic practice?
Yep, for sure. I was an 80's kid which meant I was also growing up in the peak of the New York graffiti movement which hit Sydney pretty hard. Catching a train to school, it just seemed like a natural progression to try and emulate what I was seeing trackside and on 'Beat Street'. Ha


"All the paintings are large scale works using my signature palette of pink, grey and black continuing my fascination with sky masses. It will be my third show at China Heights (2nd solo). I'm really excited to show this new body of work."

-Brooklyn Whelan


Tell us a secret -
I hate avocado, but I love guacamole

What does the day-to-day of Brooklyn Whelan look like?
It's pretty routine. I try and have structure to keep the momentum. Wake up, make a coffee for my wife, walk the dog then paint. I try and keep it pretty chill.

Your exhibition, ‘Pushing Past’, at China Heights is going down on Friday, March 31st at 6pm. Tell us a bit about the show!
All the paintings are large scale works using my signature palette of pink, grey and black continuing my fascination with sky masses. It will be my third show at China Heights (2nd solo). I'm really excited to show this new body of work.

Is there anything you’re hoping people will take away from your exhibition?
A painting! And I hope for people to feel my works in the real.

What can we look forward to seeing in 2017?
More solo shows here and internationally.


10 Questions with Scott Marsh

Kanye kissing Kanye, Kimmy K’s booty pic and Casino Mike are a few of the characters on infamous Sydney artist Scott Marsh’s repertoire. With a strong background in traditional graffiti, Marsh has brought a new flavour to the table, blowing up the internet while he’s at it. Going on 18000 instagram followers, Marsh’s controversial and colourful murals have reached viral status instantaneously. We spoke to the man himself and found out what its really like to be Scott Marsh.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL 


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I’m a Sydney based artist.

What was your introduction to painting large scale murals? What was your first piece?
I was working as a commercial muralist for a number of years when I finished uni, there wasn't a whole lot of love in many of the jobs but it was a great learning curve. I was forced out of my comfort zone, painting a huge range of different subject matters and spaces. It made me pretty versatile. Before this I was painting graffiti for over 10 years so painting big, fast and in less than ideal environments was already something I was pretty accustomed to. My first graffiti piece was the word ‘Beaver’ with a Wutang sign in the middle of it. Beaver was my nickname in high school.

What does your day-to-day look like?
Generally a mixture private jets, cocaine, strippers and roast dinners. Nothing too exciting.

Your work often references graffiti culture, has this played a role in your development as an artist?
Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity. Most of the techniques, mediums and ideas I have in terms of my art practice come from lessons I have learned as a graffiti writer. It breeds an ingenuity, resilience and a ‘get it done’ attitude you don't get at art school.


"Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity."

-Scott Marsh


Tell us about your George Michael mural -
It was a commission/collaboration of sorts between the property owners who were both good friends of George Michael. I was approached by them months ago to paint their wall, which is huge and in a unreal location right on the train line at St Peters. I had plans to paint a different mural on the wall but after George Michael passed away they asked if I would consider painting something of a memorial to celebrate his life. We sat down and had a bit of a brain storm and they shared some stories from their time with George. We settled on the idea of George Michael as a 'Patron saint to the gays". I went away and came up with a design and the rest is history. The response has been amazing and have a had a lot of people thanking me for the healing the wall has given them. George Michael was a incredible person and touched a lot of people.

Some of your murals, like the Kanye kissing Kanye wall, shot to fame on social media instantly. What is it like to suddenly have so much notoriety online?
When you paint something and it gets shared with thousands, sometimes millions, of people it's a great feeling.


"If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on."

-Scott Marsh


What's one thing we don't know about Scott Marsh?
I have 11 toes.

A lot of your art has political undertones, do you have a main message you'd like to preach to the masses?
If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on.  

What's on the cards for you going into 2017?
I have 2 exhibitions planned, one for early May and the other for later in the year, as well as a tone of murals and other projects. It's going to be a very busy year and I'm really looking forward to it.

Any words of advice for any budding artists out there?
Get up early! work hard and trust you own instinct.

www.scottmarsh.com.au