Posts tagged graffiti
10 Questions with Scott Marsh

Kanye kissing Kanye, Kimmy K’s booty pic and Casino Mike are a few of the characters on infamous Sydney artist Scott Marsh’s repertoire. With a strong background in traditional graffiti, Marsh has brought a new flavour to the table, blowing up the internet while he’s at it. Going on 18000 instagram followers, Marsh’s controversial and colourful murals have reached viral status instantaneously. We spoke to the man himself and found out what its really like to be Scott Marsh.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL 


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I’m a Sydney based artist.

What was your introduction to painting large scale murals? What was your first piece?
I was working as a commercial muralist for a number of years when I finished uni, there wasn't a whole lot of love in many of the jobs but it was a great learning curve. I was forced out of my comfort zone, painting a huge range of different subject matters and spaces. It made me pretty versatile. Before this I was painting graffiti for over 10 years so painting big, fast and in less than ideal environments was already something I was pretty accustomed to. My first graffiti piece was the word ‘Beaver’ with a Wutang sign in the middle of it. Beaver was my nickname in high school.

What does your day-to-day look like?
Generally a mixture private jets, cocaine, strippers and roast dinners. Nothing too exciting.

Your work often references graffiti culture, has this played a role in your development as an artist?
Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity. Most of the techniques, mediums and ideas I have in terms of my art practice come from lessons I have learned as a graffiti writer. It breeds an ingenuity, resilience and a ‘get it done’ attitude you don't get at art school.


"Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity."

-Scott Marsh


Tell us about your George Michael mural -
It was a commission/collaboration of sorts between the property owners who were both good friends of George Michael. I was approached by them months ago to paint their wall, which is huge and in a unreal location right on the train line at St Peters. I had plans to paint a different mural on the wall but after George Michael passed away they asked if I would consider painting something of a memorial to celebrate his life. We sat down and had a bit of a brain storm and they shared some stories from their time with George. We settled on the idea of George Michael as a 'Patron saint to the gays". I went away and came up with a design and the rest is history. The response has been amazing and have a had a lot of people thanking me for the healing the wall has given them. George Michael was a incredible person and touched a lot of people.

Some of your murals, like the Kanye kissing Kanye wall, shot to fame on social media instantly. What is it like to suddenly have so much notoriety online?
When you paint something and it gets shared with thousands, sometimes millions, of people it's a great feeling.


"If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on."

-Scott Marsh


What's one thing we don't know about Scott Marsh?
I have 11 toes.

A lot of your art has political undertones, do you have a main message you'd like to preach to the masses?
If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on.  

What's on the cards for you going into 2017?
I have 2 exhibitions planned, one for early May and the other for later in the year, as well as a tone of murals and other projects. It's going to be a very busy year and I'm really looking forward to it.

Any words of advice for any budding artists out there?
Get up early! work hard and trust you own instinct.

www.scottmarsh.com.au

Surf City

WORDS: TROY PROUDFOOT / PHOTOGRAPHY: @KINGSTONPHOTO

THE YEAR WAS 1958, AND THERE, BENEATH THE HOT CALIFORNIAN SUMMER SUN, THE GREAT WHITE HOPE THAT BECAME TO BE KNOWN AS SALTON CITY WAS BORN INTO A MODERN WORLD FILLED WITH SO MANY FAILED STARTS AND STRAINED ATTEMPTS. HERE WAS AN ECLECTIC ’50S SUBURBAN WONDERLAND IN ITS INFANCY, BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH OVERFLOWING OPTIMISM, AND YET A RISING SALINE SEA WAS ENOUGH TO BRING IT CRUMBLING TO ITS KNEES. IT WAS AN IMAGINARY CITY OF NEW BEGINNINGS THAT SHONE LIKE THE GREAT AMERICAN DREAM, WITH AN EXPIRATION DATE THAT CAME WAY TOO SOON.

It’s a zip code that once brought tourists in droves to the sandy beaches of the salton sea but now sits silent and desolate. A heart that once beat at its core now lies shattered in pieces as the remnants of a bygone era litter the streets and muddy the shoreline. North shore is now the outlands of the golden age where the surfers, rogue hearts and disenchanted all came to spend their endless summers, but really only came to live and die quietly in the night.

Setting out on the road from Salton City is like driving on a road to nowhere. It reaches up to consume all who venture into a realm that is honestly just disintegrating there in plain sight beneath the California sun. On approach, it’s the initial sight of the manmade ‘Salvation Mountain’ emblazoned in its colourful religious epitaphs out there in an the unforgiving setting of the Colorado desert that takes your breath away. Post-apocalyptic hell in essence, yet strangely beautiful and awe-inspiring in nature.

Dilapidated rest stops and gas stations now serve as sentries to a long forgotten villa of abandoned hair salons, hardware stores, trailer parks, houses of worship and drugstores. Out here in the slabs, squatters and nomads known as ‘snowbirds’ return to the outlands for the winter months to live off the grid and thrive in the middle of fucking nowhere, just to prove that technology is the root of all evil. Summertime sadness reigns supreme out here among the art installations, forgotten dreams, grit and grime.

Want this in print? Surf City is available in newsagents throughout Australia and our online shop.

 

 

 

 

WONDERWALLS FESTIVAL 2015
                                                   

                                                   

Words: Sarah Hazlehurst / Photography: Luke Shirlaw

Back in Wollongong for the third time, Wonderwalls festival celebrated four consecutive years of bringing cities to life with colour and creativity. Out with the boring, blank brick canvases of the city scape, and in with embracing creative culture, the celebrated graffiti and street artists of Wonderwalls festival showcase an appreciated approach to public art and large scale muralism.

With local, national and international artists flocking to the tiny town from October 2-4, the city hosted a few expected favourites including local Wollongong favourite Bafcat, Straya’s graffiti superman Sofles, as well as international legends including Spain’s Felipe Pantone, Amsterdam’s Amok and New Zealand brother duo, BMD.

Other stand outs from the festival included Brisbane’s own Guido Van Helten, Sydney’s Georgia Hill and Melbourne’s Dvate.

If you made the trek down to Wolly’ for the live transformation of Wonderwalls, hopefully you were lucky enough to catch the free artists talks held over the weekend, including conversations with Brisbane babe and film front runner, Selina Miles, (Featured in No Cure Issue 07, Girl Power).

Incase you missed it, here’s a few shots captured by major sponsor, Ironlak.

THE BIGGEST CALLIGRAPHY ARTWORK IN RUSSIA

A phenomenal calligraphy artwork spanning fifteen hundred square meters in size has appeared sky high in the heart of Moscow, twenty-two stories above the city floor.

WORDS: SARAH HAZLEHURST / PHOTOGRAPHY: KLEPNEV / PRODUCER: SERGEY VALYAEV

Created by Russian calligraphy/graffiti artist Pokras Lampas, the mural was produced with four large brooms and 730 litres of paint, utilising an inner city rooftop as a canvas.

Taking only two days to create this jaw dropping mural, Porkas and his team have broken records for both complexity and scale, with the not so surprising official confirmation that it is now the biggest calligraphy artwork in Russia.

This video documentation of the event provides an up close and personal encounter showing the emotive, experiential and interesting process of Prokas’s creation.


The one thing that has baffled us about this project is our inability to comprehend what the calligraphy actually articulates to! Would any Russians in the house care to translate exactly what this incredible artwork actually says?

Although the question of translation is keeping us curious, the real underlining strength of this mural is its ability to scream out across countries, without actually saying a word. 

All in all, this remarkable artwork gets a big A+ from us. 

www.calligroof.com

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