Posts tagged mural
Giant News

Early today Vivid Sydney announced its line-up for this year’s event starting in May. And we can’t get our eyes off the fact that Shepard Fairey is on the list. We caught up with Eddie Zammit to discuss the exciting news.

PHOTOGRAPHY: NICOLE REED


“It’s taken 3 good years behind-the-scenes to make it happen and we’re thrilled that he’ll be in Sydney for the first time in 14 years,” Zammit says. He will be headlining a Game-Changer talk as part of Vivid Ideas exclusively for Vivid Sydney in June – tickets have just gone on sale. Fairey will be speaking on Saturday, 17 June at the Sydney Town Hall. Tickets can be purchased here: http://bit.ly/vividshepard Zammit confirms that, “The essence of Shepard’s talk will be placed on his DIY mantra.”


“Creating is about sharing ideas, sharing aesthetics, and sharing what you believe in with other people. Vivid Sydney is the perfect platform to do this in Australia.” 

-Shepard Fairey


“Creating is about sharing ideas, sharing aesthetics, and sharing what you believe in with other people. Vivid Sydney is the perfect platform to do this in Australia,” says Shepard Fairey. As an artist he is best known for the OBEY art project, the HOPE poster promoting Barak Obama and more recently We The People campaign.

Outside of the talk, he is expected to paint the largest mural in the Sydney CBD. This will take place from 12 – 17 June. Stay tuned for details on that one. There are also plans to have a free exhibition at Darling Quarter.

More news as this comes to hand. 

Purchase your tickets here: http://bit.ly/vividshepard

Shepard_by NicoleReed_6_LR.jpg
10 Questions with Scott Marsh

Kanye kissing Kanye, Kimmy K’s booty pic and Casino Mike are a few of the characters on infamous Sydney artist Scott Marsh’s repertoire. With a strong background in traditional graffiti, Marsh has brought a new flavour to the table, blowing up the internet while he’s at it. Going on 18000 instagram followers, Marsh’s controversial and colourful murals have reached viral status instantaneously. We spoke to the man himself and found out what its really like to be Scott Marsh.

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL 


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I’m a Sydney based artist.

What was your introduction to painting large scale murals? What was your first piece?
I was working as a commercial muralist for a number of years when I finished uni, there wasn't a whole lot of love in many of the jobs but it was a great learning curve. I was forced out of my comfort zone, painting a huge range of different subject matters and spaces. It made me pretty versatile. Before this I was painting graffiti for over 10 years so painting big, fast and in less than ideal environments was already something I was pretty accustomed to. My first graffiti piece was the word ‘Beaver’ with a Wutang sign in the middle of it. Beaver was my nickname in high school.

What does your day-to-day look like?
Generally a mixture private jets, cocaine, strippers and roast dinners. Nothing too exciting.

Your work often references graffiti culture, has this played a role in your development as an artist?
Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity. Most of the techniques, mediums and ideas I have in terms of my art practice come from lessons I have learned as a graffiti writer. It breeds an ingenuity, resilience and a ‘get it done’ attitude you don't get at art school.


"Graffiti is huge for me. It’s something I have been involved with since I was 12 years old and is not only something I love doing but a huge part of my identity."

-Scott Marsh


Tell us about your George Michael mural -
It was a commission/collaboration of sorts between the property owners who were both good friends of George Michael. I was approached by them months ago to paint their wall, which is huge and in a unreal location right on the train line at St Peters. I had plans to paint a different mural on the wall but after George Michael passed away they asked if I would consider painting something of a memorial to celebrate his life. We sat down and had a bit of a brain storm and they shared some stories from their time with George. We settled on the idea of George Michael as a 'Patron saint to the gays". I went away and came up with a design and the rest is history. The response has been amazing and have a had a lot of people thanking me for the healing the wall has given them. George Michael was a incredible person and touched a lot of people.

Some of your murals, like the Kanye kissing Kanye wall, shot to fame on social media instantly. What is it like to suddenly have so much notoriety online?
When you paint something and it gets shared with thousands, sometimes millions, of people it's a great feeling.


"If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on."

-Scott Marsh


What's one thing we don't know about Scott Marsh?
I have 11 toes.

A lot of your art has political undertones, do you have a main message you'd like to preach to the masses?
If something really pisses me off, I’ll paint a mural about it. It seems the thing that is endangering people around the world more than anything else is the politicians elected to serve them. Pursuing policies more concerned with dollar signs than the people and the planet they live on.  

What's on the cards for you going into 2017?
I have 2 exhibitions planned, one for early May and the other for later in the year, as well as a tone of murals and other projects. It's going to be a very busy year and I'm really looking forward to it.

Any words of advice for any budding artists out there?
Get up early! work hard and trust you own instinct.

www.scottmarsh.com.au

JUSTKIDS appoints UK Artist D*Face for a massive public installation in Arkansas
All images: Raymesh Cintron / Zane Cash

All images: Raymesh Cintron / Zane Cash

JUSTKIDS presents their favorite UK artist D*Face last project and interview in the Northwest Arkansas region. Coming back for the second time in the town of Fort Smith, the British artist created not one but two impressive correlated works. A large-scale mural and a massive public sculpture made of five 40 foot long wooden arrows that each weigh more than 1,000 pounds and are located now in the downtown.

After the success of their last curated project, Unexpected, an Art event held in the Northwest Arkansas region last September, JUSTKIDS, led by its curator Charlotte Dutoit, continues its mission and collaboration with local non profit 64.6 Downtown to bring high quality Contemporary Art in this area. This time guest artist UK Artist D*Face created not one but two impressive correlated works, a large-scale mural and a massive public sculpture made of five 40 foot long wooden arrows that each weigh more than 1,000 pounds located downtown Fort Smith. The town is now not only marked, but pierced by the London based artist, who is connecting these two forms of artistry for the first time. 

“Its like a two part mural/installation. The idea is to connect a wall to something sculptural. Which I have never done before and I am quite excited about it” explained D*Face while working on site. 

With a simple and clever union of an arrow and a paintbrush, D*Face’s mural confronts the past and propels into the future by hitting the bull in the eye and the bad lands in the heart. Inspired by the Native American Trail of Tears, his mural “War Paint” revives the sordid past that once took place here in Arkansas and aims it to a new direction. This glorious mural is not only symbolic, but historical and relives the unjust struggle the Native Americans experienced during the removal. After working on the wall D*Face chose to work on the ground for his massive arrows installation. Reloading himself with the native weapon of the Choctaw Nation - the Oklahoma based tribe underwrote the installation and also gave the artist advice and historical context to create his design - D*Face’s public sculpture aims, shoots and hits, from the wall to the sky, from the sky to the ground. These five immense wooden arrows are now rooted in downtown Fort Smith, Arkansas, a land rich in mystery of a conflicted (yet somehow) iconic past that never seems to exhaust itself of symbolic references, the Old West, and where its legends inspire to rise above. 

D*Face’s artistic work is much more than a comment on a long historical discussion but the way to perpetuate, with art, a tradition that serves as an inspiration for the work here presented.

www.justkidsofficial.com

Phat Chats with RONE

Having painted more women than Casanova could court, Melbourne’s key street player, RONE has one hell of a creative boner for the ladies. Bringing their beauty to life on multi storey buildings around the world, RONE’s freestyle, large-scale portraits have become his notably trademarked street style.  

Following his recent visit to sunny Queensland, No Cure’s Sarah Hazlehurst catches up with RONE to chat about females, fruit and artisan experiences. 

INTERVIEW: SARAH HAZLEHURST


So RONE, you likely get this all the time, but did you start out as a writer before you turned to large-scale muralism? 
I guess my background is more like street art, stencil graffiti, paste-ups and stickers … not the traditional letter form of a graffiti writer. I did have a crack at that, but I was just terrible at it, so I just avoided it because I knew a lot of friends and peers who were doing it an amazing level, and I couldn’t keep up, so I went on to different mediums.

That’s kind of funny because a lot of people would argue it’s more difficult to paint what you do, as oppose to the graffiti ‘writing’ type of thing?
Yeah, but I totally have a respect for graffiti writing, especially traditional graffiti.

You paint a lot of women! Was there one original female muse who inspired you?
Not a specific one I can name, but I think the reason I started was because it was something clearly different to what my friends and I were doing. Everyone was doing things that were very heroic or masculine or aggressive! A lot of my stuff was skateboard related you know? Let’s call it ‘extreme’. The delicate female image was the total opposite of all of that. There was something really nice about the way it gave this calming feeling on the street when everything else was so noisy. I guess I really just fell in love with that juxtaposition between the beauty and the decay and the noise on the street.

Wow, that’s really nice. So that’s why you decided to continue painting women as your style?
Exactly, yeah.

Throughout your career as a ‘street artist’, have you even run into any trouble? Surely you didn’t start out doing these murals legally?Umm… yeah. I’ve had a few incidents, but I’ve never been arrested really.

You’ve never been arrested??
Well... I have. But I’ve never been charged. I guess there are just things you shouldn’t say in interviews, hahah.

Haha, that’s fine. On a lighter note, can you tell us a bit about your recent mural work at the Gold Coast?
Yeah, they really wanted something that led towards boutique, hand finished, craftsman style fruit and food. Not like fruit and veg’, but I guess just something that was kind of food related. I was like “ah, I don’t paint food,” hahaha.

But it was really interesting. I was thinking … I don’t want to paint this Safeway, advertising kind of thing, but it was really interesting.

Haha! Yeah, thought the fruit was quite new for you!
Haha, I’ve painted a lot of fruit before! I’ve painted Carman Miranda and she’s always got the fruit hat so I was just kind of working off that idea and the beautiful old style fruit illustrations. It was nice to do something that was boutique and hand finished for something like a supermarket, which I would usually avoid. They would usually just get something printed and stuck down, and no one really respects that, so I think they’re trying to show they’re going for this quality ‘artisan’ thing, or something like that. The plan they’re working on looks really nice.  

So have you always been drawing and sketching and painting since you were young, or did you just pick it up one day and think, shit, I’m really good at this?
Haha! No, I was drawing and painting and sketching. I moved to Melbourne to study graphic arts, so I guess that’s connected in some way. My goal was to make a living as a graphic designer, graphic artist or some kind role in the creative industry, but I never really aimed to make a living out of being just an artist as such, especially street art and graffiti. Back in 2001 no one gave a shit about this. Everything has changed since then. It will be interesting to see where it ends up or where it evolves to. 

www.r-o-n-e.com