Posts tagged skulls
N/C ARTIST PROFILE - JORDAN DEBNEY
Jelly and Bean.jpg

PSYCHEDELIC FLORA BLOOMING FROM THE MOUTHS OF CRYSTAL-EYED SKULLS AND GOOEY, NEON MONSTERS ARE SOME OF THE DRAWING FORCES BEHIND NEW ZEALAND-BASED SELF-TAUGHT ARTIST, JORDAN DEBNEY. JORDAN CREATES HIS PASTEL TRIPS USING A FUSION OF MIXED MEDIUMS OF PRISMATIC COLOURS, HOLOGRAPHIC PAPER AND UV ACRYLIC PAINTS TO MAKE HIS CREATURES COME TO LIFE IN THE DARK.

INTERVIEW: NIKKI RUSSIAN


You describe your style as ‘lilac infused prismatic death’. Could you expand on what that means, and what it means to you?
I was quite a fearful child. I was constantly convinced something terrible was seconds away from happening. Over time, my mind naturally found ways to cope with this, and after my teenage years, I was considered a pro and artwork helped me a lot with this too. You (and I) could see it as an overcompensation with colour from all the madness in my mind. If I had any say in the way I die, I would like it to be a spectacle.

What inspires or influences your unique style?
I like to play with the idea of visual contradiction. I take elements that are considered ‘dark’ or ‘macabre’ and flip it in a way that you can’t stop staring at it. Bright, comforting colours with hints of opposing, offensive hues, almost as if you can see the moment that I got carried away and took it too far. Floral-framed, pastel pink skulls show you the hidden elegance in death or something just as ominous, like it’s luring you in, telling you there’s nothing to be afraid of. I like my work to be distasteful, but like you can’t stop going back for more because it feels so good in your mouth.

How has your style changed over time?
Around this time a couple of years ago I was drawing in mostly black and white. I wasn’t really a fan of colour, and on the off chance that I did use colour it would be heavily desaturated. I didn’t have much direction and I just drew whatever I felt like drawing as if I had a lot to say and didn’t know how to say it, so the artwork repeatedly ended up being stories that had no end and half-truths. Today I like to challenge myself. I like to find possibilities in the ‘impossible’ to literally give weight to whatever I come up with in my head. I still have a lot to say but I’m still inventing the language I will one day say it with.

 

“Bright, comforting colours with hints of opposing, offensive hues, almost as if you can see the moment that I got carried away and took it too far.”

-JORDAN DEBNEY


Some of your paintings are on custom cut wood, could you run us through that process?
I forced myself into the habit of planning an entire painting perfectly at each stage of the creation process. I begin with a sketch that I work on again and again until its lines and shapes are fluid, then sketch it up onto the piece of wood. Before I even touch a power tool I make sure that I know exactly where I am going to cut. By the time I am good to go, my adrenaline is so pumped I’m not even thinking and the whole process is automatic. Once the first line is laid the thing pretty much paints itself. Most of the time I don’t remember doing it, which is a good thing seeing how tough it is on the back.


"I like my work to be distasteful, but like you can’t stop going back for more because it feels so good in your mouth."

- JORDAN DEBNEY


How did your use of UV paint and holographic paper come about?
Because I live in the dead-middle of New Zealand, our winters can get quite dark. I will leave for the day while its overcast, and I’ll come home and it’s pitch black. This always has a serious impact on my work and therefore my mental health. I needed to find a way to paint in the dark and not be reliant on natural light. The holographic idea came around about the same time to give my work that extra contradicting angle. Using new colours and mediums was challenging and frustrating and I loved it.

What are some challenges you face as an artist, in your career, or when creating your art?
The hardest thing I find personally is getting my hands on the right tools and mediums. Wellington does have its own art community and many shops that have a large amount of stock, but sometimes it still isn’t enough. I’m trying to do things I haven’t seen a lot of people do, if any, so finding the right equipment in the area is a challenge, and everyone knows the nightmares involved with purchasing art supplies online, as well as the self-inflicted bankruptcy.

What’s next for the future?
I’m currently working towards my first solo show in Wellington. Not to give away any secrets, but it will include playing with an interactive use of ultraviolet light.

www.jordandebney.com

PALEHORSE DESIGN
Image: Todd Bates Creative / Interview: Sarah Hazlehurst   

Image: Todd Bates Creative / Interview: Sarah Hazlehurst

 

AS WE JOURNEY INTO THE MIND OF CHRIS PARKS, AKA PALEHORSE DESIGN, IN THIS EVOKING, OUT-OF-THE BOX INTERVIEW, HE TALKS US THROUGH HIS UNIQUELY PLANNED ARTISTIC PROCESSES, HIGHLIGHTING HIS INCREDIBLY INTELLIGENT IDEAS, WORLDLY CREATIVE CONCEPTS, AND EMOTIVE EXPERIENCES OF MUSIC, MEDITATION, REALMS AND RELIGION. 

What was the first album you purchased? Can you tell us the story behind it?
Oh, you’re really going to embarrass me with this one! I grew up in a religious household where I was obligated to attend church at least twice a week and slog through private Christian school up until 9th grade, where I was pumped full of weird ideas about how all popular music was Satanic and would send me down a path of eternal hellfire. I remember that I used to buy terrible Christian rap tapes in middle school that just ripped off other groups and added their corny, religious messages and twisted takes on reality. I think the first tape that I bought in the 90’s was unfortunately by a group of weirdo’s called DC Talk.

What’s your favourite album of all time and why?
I’m not a person who likes to pick favorites, as I am constantly moving through genres based on moods and instinct, but I’ll go with Faith No More, King for a Day, Fool For a Lifetime. I remember blasting that album in high school while driving around with friends, signing at the top of our lungs and when I listen to it now it still stands the test of time.

 Can you describe how your designs connect with people?
My work often finds it’s roots in world culture, mythology and inner worlds that may be familiar to people. I use illustration as a way to visually work out concepts and ideas that I can’t fully grasp or communicate with words and I think the wiliness to go where the idea takes me resonates with people who are also on a path of seeking and finding for personal meaning in the images and world around them.

 If you could be reborn into any time/place/realm, where would it be and why?
I really can’t think of a more strange, thrilling, psychologically terrifying and interesting time in human history than right now. I think that this point in time (as unsettling as it is) is also incredibly fascinating and alive with possibilities. Being a digital artist, I am completely in awe of all of the infinite ways in which I can bring my ideas to life and share them with larger audiences than ever before. As physical reality becomes more and more distorted, digital concepts like virtual reality, 3D printing of products and the integration of A.I. into everything imaginable are becoming more and more prevalent. But at the same time, we are seeing a resurgence of ancient spiritual practices, meditation and shamanic influences across the globe that offer hope in the midst of the chaos. I constantly feel like I’m living inside of a super complex sci-fi novel, full of masterminds, heroes, villains, cyborgs and sorcerers.

 

Can you describe what it’s like designing for music? Tell us about your process.
I love the level of creative freedom that comes with creating artwork for gig posters. It’s the perfect balance for the way that I like to work. I’ve done some album artwork pieces, but for me the gig poster is ideal. My process is similar to the way that I create personal work for galleries, but with the added benefit of having a soundscape in mind to get my imagination going. I always start my process with a series of visualisation and meditation techniques. I pretend that I am a television receiver and I explore the visions and ideas that start to appear and I imagine how I will draw them. I like to give the ideas time to marinate and develop naturally. After the time is up, I head to my desk, open up Photoshop and quickly start piecing together reference images and sketches on my Wacom Cintiq that resemble what I was exploring in my imagination.

How long have you been screen-printing and why is that your chosen print method for posters?
There’s just something beautiful about the tactile feel of a screen print that resonates with designers and collectors. I got my professional illustration start by creating screen-printed T-shirt artwork for my good friend’s, Surf and Skate Shop back in 2004. The surf/skate shop work led to creating t-shirt designs for a range of counter culture and action sports brands. I’ve always been drawn to the bold, graphic style of screen-printed skateboard decks and gig posters. That was what got me into wanting to make art in the first place and that style just feels most fitting for my personality.

 Who are your biggest influences in digital and fine art?
I often get my influence from the infinite combinations of unrelated artwork that I’m always filling my brain with. My studio space is filled with prints, masks, toys art books and I love traveling to see various art shows, religious relics, street cultures, tattoo shops, museum exhibits, ancient temples, antique shops, and live performances. All of this, combined with technology, audio books, podcasts, meditation, cannabis and psychedelics is what influences my work. I allow any and all elements, light and dark, old and new to merge with my personal preferences and experiences to shape my aesthetic and visual message that is always in flux.

 Who are some of the most memorable musicians you’ve worked with, and why?
Jacob Bannon of Converge was the most thrilling for me. I got to create a poster and t-shirt illustration for their recent tour with At The Gates. I grew up listening to Converge heavily, going to their shows and collecting their merch’. It is a huge honor to be among the incredible lineup of artists who have created work for them over the years and I’m not gonna’ lie, I was definitely a bit nervous talking to Jacob about my concepts for the project.

Do the musicians usually have an idea what they want, or do they give you free reign in coming up with an idea/concept?
The great thing about creating gig posters is that I generally just get a list of elements that the band doesn’t want to see and the rest is up to me to create something that I think they will dig. I work best when I’m free to explore my imagination and having the built-in collector fan base of the band, combined with my audience actually allows me to experiment and try wilder concepts that I might not have attempted otherwise.

Do you believe cover art is imperative to the success of an album and poster art to the success of an event/ tour?
No matter what you are selling, the artwork and the way something it is marketed is always important. Just speaking for myself, the album cover visuals always affects my perception of the band. The artwork is usually what is experienced first before I hear the band or go to the show and whether I want it to or not, it makes me cast a quick judgement or feel one way or another. When the album art is good, I want to like the band, so I tend to give it more of a chance. If I don’t like the artwork, I’m quicker to write it off. 

Has any one particular album, song or artist inspired your creative life path or helped to shape you into the person you are today?
I have never felt driven by any one band, artist, style or point of view. I think the thing that has most shaped my personality is my innate hunger for varied perspectives and novelty. 

www.palehorsedesign.com