Posts tagged street art
10 QUESTIONS WITH KYLE HUGHES-ODGERS
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Combining beautifully curated colour palettes and a sprinkle of childhood nostalgia, Kyle Hughes-Odgers splashes brand new worlds on to walls internationally. With the successful release of multiple childrens’ books, Hughes-Odgers is taking the art world by storm. Here at No Cure we love to sneak inside the brains of great creatives, so we sat down with Kyle for a chat! Here’s what we found out...

INTERVIEW: RUBY AVERY-DE WAAL


Tell us a little bit about yourself!
I'm visual artist based in Perth, W.A

What does a typical day in the life of Kyle Hughes-Odgers look like?
I wake up, hang out with my son, coffee, emails, catch the train to my studio in Fremantle, coffee, painting, emails, go home, hang out with my son.

Amongst many other achievements, you’ve written and illustrated your own children’s books including titles such as ‘Ten Tiny Things’ and ‘Can a Skeleton Have an X-Ray?’. What drew you towards creating work for children?
Children's books are still broadly accepted in the conservative adult world when they are very strange and unique. I have always loved this, like little creative revolutions sitting patiently waiting to be considered in homes around the world. When I was small it seemed like a dream that adults could draw and make strange books for a living. Most of my work is narrative based so a children's book is a good way of extending concepts and ideas.

Much of your work is quite soft and playful in colour and subject matter. Where do you draw your inspiration?
I make lots of notes around narratives and concepts I find interesting / little drawings of compositions or spacial balance that I might see in nature and want to remember. I like to use colours that are more sophisticated and muted than loud and obnoxious.

Do you feel as though your style has changed much over time?
Yes, it is constantly changing. 12 years ago I only drew black and white posters of people with tattoos and 10 double chins. I think it's important it grows and moves as I get older and moves with what I find interesting.

You recently completed the painting of 4 silos as part of Art in the Wheatbelt. Tell us a bit about the project!
I was commissioned to paint 4 x 35m silos in Merredin in the wheatbelt of Western Australia. The work is part of a bigger project called the public silo trail in Western Australia and aims to cast a light on these beautiful, distinctive regions. Tourism maps will connect the completed silos for visitors to tour. It was a great and challenging project to paint at such an extreme scale.

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"I was commissioned to paint 4 x 35m silos in Merredin in the wheatbelt of Western Australia. The work is part of a bigger project called the public silo trail in Western Australia and aims to cast a light on these beautiful, distinctive regions."

-Kyle Hughes-Odgers


Is there anything you aim for people to take away from your art?
Recently I have been actively trying to make more positive narratives / works rather than focusing on the negative. Making paintings about celebrating human problem solving and ingenuity and also playing with colour and abstraction. Focusing on the broader idea of human spirit.

Tell us a secret...
Secrets are for creeps.

What can we expect to see from you in the near future?
More public art, I have solo exhibitions in Madrid and Melbourne next year, and working on more book ideas.

Any advice for the kids of tomorrow?
Don't wait to be magically basquiated into the artworld. Work really hard.

www.kylehughesodgers.com

FOR SYRIA'S CHILDREN
Artist: RONE

Artist: RONE

Inspired by his recent trips to war torn Syria, to make art with children in Aleppo, international artist ELK (Luke Cornish) created the not for profit ‘For Syria’s Children’ (FSC) an Australian fundraising project aiming to provide financial assistance to young Syrians that have been tragically affected by the relentless Syrian civil war.


Below artist: 23rd Key

FSC’s sole objective is to raise vital financial aid that will be directly provided to a number of local (on the ground) Syrian organisations that are in desperate need of supplies for basic amenities in orphanages, medical facilities and schools.

FSC believes in providing absolute transparency as to how donations will be used. There will be minimal fees involved for the fundraising event and financial provisions for the nominated FSC representatives to travel to and from Syria to deliver the financial aid. There will be no other major administrative costs, allowing for a large percentage of all donations to be delivered directly to Syria’s most vulnerable.


Below left to right artists: Vans the Omega / Alex Lehours

All of the artists have generously donated a signature piece of their work for the exhibition, with all artworks available for purchase prior to the exhibition through: www.elkstencils.com/forsyriaschildren 

The remaining pieces available through silent auction at the event’s official closing. The show features an extensive list of Australia’s most respected urban artists including Adnate, Anthony Lister, Rone, ELK, HA-HA plus more.


Below left to right artists: ELK / Steve Cross / Phoenix

When: Wednesday, 27 September, 11am - 6pm viewing and sale of artworks Thursday, 28 September, 11am - 6pm viewing and sale of artworks Thursday, 28 September, 6pm - 9pm Silent Auction and official party till 10pm.

Where: Besser Space Gallery, 15-25 Keele Street, Collingwood 3066

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The Culprit Club-Back To Square One
Below: WIP artworks by Kiss, Bafcat, John Kaye, Aeon, Maid, Buttons,Lusid Art, Lauren Webster, Arswandaru, Pat Rogash and Dean Nenadich.

Below: WIP artworks by Kiss, Bafcat, John Kaye, Aeon, Maid, Buttons,Lusid Art, Lauren Webster, Arswandaru, Pat Rogash and Dean Nenadich.

Next Friday, Brisbane’s cosiest, yet most innovatively occupied art gallery, ‘The Culprit Club’ turns one-year-old.

After an insanely successful 12 months, featuring almost 100 local, interstate and international artists though a series of solo/group exhibitions, hosting over 20 events and launching a local creatives residency program, it’s crazy to think how far the the humble beginnings of The Culprit Club have come.

To celebrate their ripe young age, The Culprit’s one year birthday show, 'Back To Square One' is really something special. Keeping true to their ‘art amity’ ideals, they’re launching an all collaborative group show featuring 40+ artists who've been the heart and soul of the space over the last year. 

'Back To Square One' may be one of the first exclusively collaborative artist exhibitions we've heard of. With each individual bringing the uniqueness of their personal styles to compliment, contrast and come together with the style of another, it really is all for one, and one for all!

Make sure you head out to Winn Lane, Fortitude Valley from 6pm, next Friday 14 July to peep the collaborative works of all the artists, and party with the culprit crew!

Exhibition line up includes:
Aeon, Aidan Ryan, Alex Lehours, Arswandaru, Bafcat, Blex, Buttons, Billie Schneider, Chris Doyle, Chehehe, Chrissie Abbott, Dean Nenadich, Diz, Drule, Emmanuel Moore, Funeral French, Graham Hare, Hanna, Inkboy, Irok, Ivo, James Nye, John Kaye, Kiss, Kiel Tillman, Lauren Webster, Lusid Art, Lucinda Wolber, Lucks, Luke Henery, Maid, Markus Ravik, Memos, Oh Noes, Pat Rogasch, Phibs, ProCreativ, Reuben Stocks, Sevens, Shaman, Soda Mouf and 1337.

Join the party and full details via the Culprit Club's FB event page.

On the Wall - 'Paint The Polytechnic' project

Leading mural artists Sofles, Guido Van Helten and Reka have teamed up to transform Melbourne Polytechnic’s Prahran Campus with epic large scale murals on 3 seven storey walls.


Beginning December 2016 and produced and curated by leading street artist management agency Juddy Roller, the Paint The Polytechnic project saw world-class Australian and international street artists deepen Melbourne Polytechnic's cultural legacy of public art with many new must-see art installations.

The project was captured on video by Round3, and features aerial and close up slots of Sofles, Guido Van Helten and Reka working on their respective walls, and some amazing shots of their finished work.

“It’s great to see our educational institutes taking such a forward thinking approach to the visual regeneration of their facilities, says Shaun Hossack, curator at Juddy Roller. “Street art is quickly becoming the fastest growing art movement in Australia and by supporting works of this scale, Melbourne Polytechnic is at the forefront of the movement, helping to increase the visibility and appreciation of an art form that has been long been hidden within the city’s hidden laneways.

“I hope other institutions and organisations take notice and put their support behind future art projects that are as unique and exciting as this one.”

The project was supported by the City of Stonnington and Chapel Street Precinct.

“The uniqueness of Chapel Street is again being reflected in Melbourne Polytechnic’s massive new murals, which will only add to the streets international standing as an exciting destination." says John Lotton, President of the Chapel Street Precinct Association.

“We’re thrilled that we can continue the cultural legacy of Prahran Technical School by visually reinvigorating the campus. In showcasing some of Australia’s best street artists on incredibly big concrete canvases, we allow creativity and inspiration to be central to what we do on a creative arts campus,” said Tim Nikolsky, lecturer at Melbourne Polytechnic Prahran.

“With the extraordinary Art Silos Trail amongst other incredible projects, Juddy Roller have had a huge impact on the development of Australia’s world class street art scene. What they are doing is vitally important in communities.” he continued.

Juddy Roller’s recent projects including the Silo Art Trail, a project currently underway which will see renowned street artists transform grain silos in six small towns across Victoria, as well as Victoria’s only major street art festival—Wall to Wall festival happening in Benalla on April 7 - April 9, which is expected to draw over 4,000 people to the small town for artist demonstrations and talks, workshops, skate demos and street art tours.

www.juddyroller.com.au


“I hope other institutions and organisations take notice and put their support behind future art projects that are as unique and exciting as this one.”

-John Lotton